Favorite Books

Favorite Books

I’m a bit eclectic when it comes to my reading.  I find a little here, and then a little there, and maybe sometimes something in between.  Here are the latest things I’ve read for education or amusement:

The book of Ginsengauth Sarah Harriman, pub Pyramid Books, NY, first ed 1973.

Cinematic Wilmington, Making Movies on the East Coast, auth Jean Nance, pub Tidal Press, NC, first ed 2000.

 

Philosophy Made Simpleauth Richard Popkin, pub Doubleday, NY, first ed 1956.

The Backpacker’s Handbookauth Chris Townsend, pub Ragged Mountain Press, Maine, first ed 1991.

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Antique Glass Hunting

Figure 1: Etched Glass from 1870 – 1925  ( click to enlarge )

We wander around in flea markets and such places as that, looking for that glint of light that sometimes reveals glass artwork from a bygone era.  In particular, the hunt is targeted to Tiffin glass, something that was made during the last part of the nineteenth century, and the start of the twentieth.  It’s a collection process that never ends, because there are pieces that are thought to be no longer in existence.  The idea that we’d land the Sasquatch, is part of a motivation I guess.  The glass heralds from a place close to where we grew up, and so it makes sense that it’s interesting to us.  In spite of the fancy glass, it’s not at all an expensive hobby. For some more pics of the antique etched glass, see my photo repository at:

https://stormofphotons.smugmug.com

On the photo site, you’ll have to click the “Antique Glass” menu item towards the top of the page.  I have a bunch of other photos on the site, as photography is another hobby of mine.  While the other half is on the hunt for her glassware, I keep my eyes peeled for the antique woodworking tools that I sometimes use.  Use for what, you ask?  Why, of course, I use them to build cabinets for the glassware! For details of this endeavor, see the woodworking subsection of my blog at:

https://woodworkingmiscellany.wordpress.com

 

Water Swept Grasses

Figure 1: Water swept grasses.  Click to enlarge.

The Pentax has seen better days.  The mirrorbox has been torqued such that focus is difficult, but once in a while I still manage to get a shot with it.  The focus issue is more difficult at infinity focus rather than closer … and the shot in figure 1 was the latter.  It’s an area where (not very long ago) – a swift current rushed through the grasses, leaving an almost surreal sculpting of the top of the grass.  It looks like a scene out of one of my old 3D viewer slide machine slides – with leprechauns  just off to the side of the photo no doubt!  Click it to enlarge it – it’s an interesting natural bit of mother-earth art IMO.

For those wanting a direct link to my smugmug nature collection, here it is (just click picture):

Walking Rhythms

Every year I experience the same seasonal rhythms of walking.  I’m so used to walking at a level just above the friction point (where it starts to become more work than walk) – that I forget to notice how fast I’m going.  I take in the scenery, engage in my inner and outer thought processes, and don’t pay much attention to the engine gauges.  The engine is usually silent.

But at the change of seasons, I notice that my speed changes.  I don’t consciously walk any faster when fall comes around, but my body goes faster.  I have so consistently trained it to walk at the friction point, that it does so without any help.  I notice I get home for lunch sooner, and I more quickly get to the local convenience store that I use as psychological motivation (soda, sweets, etc) – so as to take walks on days I otherwise might skip.

In the summer, the opposite thing happens.  As the temperature rises, the inner automatic engine governor cuts back the throttle, and the speed goes down.  Once again, I take no part in the decision, because I’m just along for the ride.

Speaking of lunch, my internal calorie meter on some days might look like the graphic shown above, if not for that  convenient little store at the end of my walking itinerary.

Buggy for Bees

Figure 1 : Bee shot taken with K5, Pentax 50mm /f1.4 vintage lens

Recently I started to take macro tube shots of bees in my area.  This is quite an addicting facet of photography, I must say.  So far I’ve managed to shoot a few semi-interesting shots.  The picture in figure 1 is one of my favorites thus far (clicking on the photo will show it enlarged on smugmug).

The Amazing Mr. Mouse

This story is one I’ve been meaning to write for a long time, but other things have been serious distractions from writing, especially in the recent past. Sometimes, ya gotta do what you want to do, in the present, because tomorrows have the habit of being used for other things.

This story is quite a few years old, but it’s one that makes me rethink the nature of nature, and of our animal friends.  “Friends” is a conventional word that often doesn’t really apply to both parties in man – to – animal relationships.  It’s most often the human who’s the fickle friend.

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