Quarkety Quark (2)

quark2

Posted 05/01/2013:

I had gotten to the point, in Doctor Pagel’s book(1), where he had written about primordial elements.  Primordial elements are those elements that came first.  I guess that’s intuitive enough.  In the beginning was hydrogen.  Hydrogen had a son and two daughters by way of nuclear fusion.  The son’s name was Deuterium and the daughters were Lithium and Helium.

The aforementioned foursome constitutes a clan known as the Primordial Elements.  It may also be a rock-funk band.  Doctor Pagel’s book went into great detail about the genesis of stars, star dust, and assorted related esoterica.  To be fair, the good doctor’s book was kept fairly close to the vest.  I added the genealogical analogy, for the bemusement of the other half, sipping her coffee, and doing her best to ignore me.  I think she was successful.

The doctor may be a little more pragmatic than I.  Let me quote:

“Astrophysicists believe that only light elements, like hydrogen and helium, with a bit of deuterium and lithium, but no heavy elements, got cooked up in the big bang that created the universe. Astrophysicists call these first elements “primordial elements” …”

The quote was taken from Perfect Symmetry, the book this author is currently   deciphering.  Truthfully, it’s a book written for those who are not astrophysicists, but that’s an endeavor never meeting entirely with success.  I might add that Dr. Heinz has hit the mark with more accuracy than some others in this regard … but … some bias must be applied because I’m used to reading such books.  They’re a bit of a fetish for me.

The conjecture of the astrophysicists is that the first stars, descending from the energies of the big bang, were made almost entirely of these Primordial Elements.  They have accumulated a fair amount of scientific legwork, done in support of the conjecture.  I suppose we could call it theory …

Continue to part threehttps://ronaldscheckelhoff.wordpress.com/quarkety-quark-3/

1 – Perfect Symmetry, Heinz Pagels, Simon and Schuster, 1985

To be continued …

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