Light Creates/Grows Latticework as it Propagates

Light grows latticework in the direction of its propagation, via its percolation, and then its refraction. When entanglement is involved, light creates a superlattice in the direction of propagation. This latticework is the result of the action of the percolation of light through lyotropic aether, as opposed to the subsequently refracted transverse light energies.

This is a better way to describe two phase or two mode light, than the way I have used in the past.  I’ve been describing two-factor light as a self aligning, self propagating effect, akin to the lyotropic crystal alignment that happens in LCD monitors.  But – it’s more than just an alignment – it’s literally the creation of a lattice framework in a way analogous to the well known elemental crystallography associated with physical chemistry.  It’s just that it happens in lyotropic aether as opposed to normal matter.

The magic angle of 1.1 degrees misalignment is what creates superlattices in the types of crystals used for generating entangled photons. The same 1.1 degree angle creates a superlattice in graphene, which subsequently leads to paramagnetism effects and to superconductance. So, light in transit is not necessarily a superlattice creator, but causes only lattice alignments when the magic angle is not involved.

Note: the author is a writer on technical subjects in some areas, of novels, and of other literature, but does not have any formal credentials related to the medical field, or in physics.  Thus, this all constitutes an opinion of what might be possible, based on his own hobby-level knowledge quests

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